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Bed Blocking up by 1.8m days

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Bed Blocking In England Up By 32% Since 2011/12 New GMB Study Shows

The severe cuts in local authorities’ social services provision is the major contributory factor for bed-blocking getting worse says GMB

GMB Congress in Bournemouth was told today that the number of days lost to bed blocking has increased by 32% in English hospitals between 2011/12 and 2015/16.

In 2015/16 NHS patients in England who were ready to be discharged but were kept in hospital due to delays in providing alternative care were delayed by 1,809,883 days. This was an increase of 436,491 days compared with 1,373,392 days in 2011/12.

The changes in the nine regions of the England are as follows: For the North West there was an increase of 91,234 days to 229,757 in 2015/16. For the South East there was an increase of 88,902 days to 352,468. For the South West there has been an increase of 83,433 days to 257,900. For the East of England there has been an increase of 57,753 days to 193,688. For London there has been an increase of 37,053 days to 174,981. For Yorkshire and the Humber there has been an increase of 35,293 days to 146,646. For The West Midlands there has been an increase of 28,635 days to 237,724.For the East Midlands there has been an increase of 27,676 days to 166,823. The North East was the only region not to see an increase to the number of days lost to bed blocking, reporting a decrease of 16,959 to 43,104. The table below shows the full details for the nine regions in England.

Set out in notes to Editor are details for the twenty areas in England with the largest increase in days delayed leaving NHS hospitals between 2011/12 and 2015/16.

There are no figures available for the total number of patients delayed. On one day at the end of each month the NHS counts the number of patients in hospital whose discharge is delayed. For the year 2015/16 for those 12 days the total was 63,167 patients, an increase of 14,466, 30%, since 2011/12.

The data, published by NHS England was analysed and ranked by GMB. See notes to editors for sources and definitions. The table in Notes to Editors 2 sets out the official data for all 9 regions in the England. The raw data for 151 areas in England plus the other GMB press releases with regional data are set out as PDFs at the foot of the national release at GMB website http://www.gmb.org.uk/newsroom/

The impact of bed blocking on the NHS is set out in a new report adopted by the Congress entitled ‘GMB in the Care Sector – Campaigning to prevent the collapse of Social Care.’ The report is set out as a pdf at the foot of the National press release on the GMB website at www.gmb.org.uk.

 

Number of Delayed Days

 
 

2011/12

2015/16

change

England

1,373,392

1,809,883

436,491

       

North West

138,523

229,757

91,234

South East

263,566

352,468

88,902

South West

174,467

257,900

83,433

East of England

135,935

193,688

57,753

London

137,928

174,981

37,053

Yorkshire and The Humber

111,353

146,646

35,293

West Midlands

209,089

237,724

28,635

East Midlands

139,147

166,823

27,676

North East

60,063

43,104

-16,959

 

Rehana Azam, GMB National Secretary for Public Services, speaking at the Congress in Bournemouth said "Bed-blocking, which is a millstone around the neck of the NHS, has got considerably worse since the Tories took control of the nation’s finances.

Bed-blocking is now a problem made in Downing Street and the Prime Minister and the Chancellor of the Exchequer are wholly responsible for it.

The severe cuts in local authorities’ social services provision is the major contributory factor for bed-blocking getting worse.

For England as a whole bed-blocking has increased from 1.4 million days in 2011/12 to over 1.8 million days last year. 

Councils have had to shunt the problem to the NHS. Councils have not been able to accept the patients from the NHS because they have been starved of funds.

The government has refused to fund the NHS fairly and in recent years, health spending has fallen well short of GDP.  As the fifth richest country, it's dire how our old and vulnerable are being treated.” 

End

Contact: Rehana Azam 07841 181656; Justin Bowden on 07710 631351; Elly Baker on 07918768773 or GMB press office on 07970 863411 or 07739 182691

Notes to Editors

1 GMB contacted NHS England for an explanation of possible anomalies in the data regarding changes between 2011/12 and 2015/16. We were told that detailed analysis has not been carried out and that there were no resources available to investigate further.

2 There were a variety of reasons delaying the discharge of patients from hospitals in 2015/16. These include sorting out a place in a care home (27.8%), sorting out care at a patient’s home (19.9%), delays in arranging further NHS care (18.3%), interagency delays (17.1%), delays due to patient or family choice about future care (12.8%) and other reasons (4.1%). The figures shown are for England for the year 2015/16.

3 Source: NHS England, Delayed Transfer of Care

  • Data is totalled monthly delayed transfers of care from April 2011 to March 2012 and for March 2015 to April 2016.
  • A delayed transfer can occur when a patient is medically fit for discharge from care and is still occupying a bed.
  • Data are for the Local Authorities with Adult Social Services Responsibilities that are responsible for each patient delayed covering NHS patients in English hospitals.
  • Delays include: Awaiting completion of assessment; awaiting public funding; awaiting further non-acute NHS care; awaiting nursing or residential home placement; awaiting care package in own home; awaiting community equipment and adaptions; patient or family choice; disputes.

4 Comparisons of the 20 areas in England with the largest increase in days delayed leaving NHS hospitals between 2011/12 and 2015/16.

   

Number of Delayed Days

 

rank

 

2011/12

2015/16

change

1

Hampshire

27,209

66,564

39,355

2

Northamptonshire

21,173

52,000

30,827

3

Kent

30,222

50,934

20,712

4

Sheffield

5,699

23,411

17,712

5

Lancashire

26,756

44,073

17,317

6

Cornwall

22,678

39,786

17,108

7

Staffordshire

19,184

35,359

16,175

8

Devon

30,487

46,481

15,994

9

Essex

22,972

37,855

14,883

10

Bristol UA

11,325

25,981

14,656

11

Cumbria

16,962

31,579

14,617

12

Somerset

11,032

25,527

14,495

13

Lincolnshire

19,749

33,442

13,693

14

Suffolk

14,180

27,572

13,392

15

Tameside

512

13,097

12,585

16

Hertfordshire

36,312

48,744

12,432

17

Leeds

23,498

34,989

11,491

18

East Sussex

18,763

29,859

11,096

19

Norfolk

17,883

27,884

10,001

20

Trafford

6,002

15,638

9,636

 

 

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Additional Resources

Delayed Transfer Of Care National Figures

download pdf170Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking Delayed Transfer Of Care National Figures

Bed Blocking East Midlands

download pdf280Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking East Midlands Press Release

Bed Blocking Eastern

download pdf282Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking Eastern Press Release

Bed Blocking London

download pdf296Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking London Press Release

Bed Blocking North East

download pdf206Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking North East Press Release

Bed Blocking North West

download pdf290Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking North West Press Release

Bed Blocking South East

download pdf211Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking South East Press Release

Bed Blocking South West

download pdf208Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking South West Press Release

Bed Blocking West Midlands

download pdf207Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking West Midlands Press Release

Bed Blocking Yorkshire & the Humber

download pdf208Kb (pdf) - 08 June 2016

Bed Blocking Yorkshire & the Humber Press Release