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GMB Launch Book On East London Landmark

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

GMB Launch In London Tomorrow 29th May Of Book On East London Landmark Silvertown Strike 125 Years Ago

Strike ended in defeat but underlined social and industrial solidarity and saw the rise of women workers within the union leading to the establishment of the first women's branch led by Eleanor Marx says GMB.

There will be a launch in London tomorrow (29th May) of a new book "Silvertown: The Lost Story of a Strike that Shook London and Helped Launch the Modern Labour Movement”.

It tells the story of the Silvertown Strike in the East End of London on the River Thames which lasted for 10 weeks - from September to December 1889 -  which was a landmark in the history of GMB.

The details of the launch are as follows:

At 6.30pm on Thursday 29 May,

Bookmarks Bookshop,

1 Bloomsbury St,

London WC1B 3QE.
 

John Callow, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and GMB, said “In 1889, Samuel Winkworth Silver's Rubber and electrical factory was the site of a massive worker revolt that upended the London industrial district which bore his name: Silvertown. The workers, long ignored by traditional craft unions, aligned themselves with the socialist New Unionism & Labour movement. They shut down Silvertown and, in the process, helped to launch a more radical, modern labour movement.

Historian and novelist John Tully tells the story of the previously relatively unknown Silvertown strike, arguing for its significance to both the labour and socialist movements. Tully presents the Silvertown Strike as a source of inspiration for today's workers, in London and around the world, who continue to struggle for better workplaces.

The Silvertown strike was a landmark in the history of GMB. Though it ended in defeat, with evictions and the onset of winter, it taught the union the value of social and industrial solidarity, and saw the rise of women workers within the union, leading to the establishment of the first women's branch led by Eleanor Marx.”

End

Contact Dr John Callow, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts Mobile number: 07946 603325 or GMB press office 07974 251 823 or 07921 289880

 

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