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List Of 184 Councils On Living Wage

Thursday, November 12, 2015

GMB List 175 Councils In England, Wales And Northern Ireland Paying And 9 Committing To Pay £8.25 Across UK And £9.40 In London Living Wage

Feedback from the employers about the 2016 pay round covering 1.5 million workers in councils  and schools in England, Wales and Northern Ireland has started says GMB.

GMB, the union for public service workers, published the names of 175 local authority employers in England, Wales and Northern Ireland paying and 9 councils committed to pay a living wage per hour of £8.25 across the UK and £9.40 in London. See notes to editors for the list set out by region as of October 2015.

On 2nd November it was announced that a living wage should be raised by 40p per hour from £7.85 per hour to £8.25 across the UK and by 25p per hour from £9.15p to £9.40 in London.

Both figures are well above the current national minimum wage of £6.70 an hour and the planned new National Living Wage of £7.20 for adults from next April. This is due to rise to £9 per hour by 2020. The Low Pay Commission is to recommend future rises in National Living Wage to reach 60% of median earnings by 2020. See notes to editors 2 below on National Minimum Wage, Living Wage or National Living Wage - the difference explained.

Justin Bowden, GMB National Officer for local authority workers, said “GMB supports the work of Living Wage Foundation to raise wages. We will continue to make strong representation to all councils across the UK to make work pay.

We have started to get feedback from the employers about the 2016 pay round for local government services and schools covering 1.5 million workers in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. 

From the employers point of view they expect their budgets to continue to be extremely challenging under this government while demands on services are ever greater. 

However the most pressing issue is the government's new so-called National Living Wage which from next April will be £7.20 and will rise quickly each year after that to £9.  The effect of this will be significant pay increases for the lowest paid and at the same time the severe erosion of differentials with those currently paid more.

Councils are saying this will need a renegotiation of the entire pay structure.  GMB will continue to press for a living wage to be set at £10 per hour as agreed at GMB Congress.

Members make clear in their experience you need at least £10 an hour and a full working week to have a decent life free from benefits and tax credits. Less than £10 an hour means just existing not living. It means a life of isolation, unable to socialise. It means a life of constant anxiety over paying bills and of borrowing from friends, family and pay day loan sharks just to make ends meet."

End

Contact: Justin Bowden GMB National Officer on 07710 631351 or Mark Bergman GMB Birmingham  Region  07957 266460 or Tony Warr GMB London Region on 07710 631336 or David Shamma GMB East Midland Region on 07966 327975 or Chris Jukes GMB Northern Region on 07870 176733 or Terry Mellor GMB North West Region on 07970 410906 or Mark Wilkinson GMB Southern Region on 07802 984267 or Althea Phillips GMB Wales and South West Region 07980 753125 or Des Risebury GMB Yorkshire Region on 07958 156848 or  GMB press office 07974 251 823 or 07921 289880

Notes to editors

1 List of 175 council employers in England, Wales and Northern Ireland paying and 9 committed to pay a living wage per hour of £8.25 across the UK and £9.40 in London.

Living wage employers – As at October 2015

R E G I O N

IMPLEMENTED

FIRMLY COMMITTED

EAST MIDLANDS[1]

Amber Valley

 

 

Ashfield

 

 

Bassetlaw

 

 

Bolsover

 

 

Charnwood

 

 

Chesterfield

 

 

Corby

 

 

Derby City

 

 

Derbyshire

 

 

Derbyshire Dales

 

 

Gedling

 

 

Leicester City

 

 

Lincoln City

 

 

Mansfield

 

 

Melton

 

 

Newark & Sherwood

 

 

North East Derbyshire

 

 

North Kesteven

 

 

North West Leicestershire

 

 

Nottinghamshire

 

 

Oadby & Wigston

 

 

West Lindsey

 

Total for Region

22

0

 

 

 

EAST OF ENGLAND[2]

 

Babergh

 

 

Bedford

 

 

 

Breckland

 

 

Cambridge City

 

 

 

Colchester

 

 

Dacorum

 

 

Harlow

 

 

Ipswich

 

 

Luton

 

 

 

Maldon

 

 

Norwich

 

 

North Norfolk

 

 

Peterborough City

 

 

St Albans

 

 

St Edmundsbury

 

 

Stevenage

 

 

Suffolk Coastal

 

 

Suffolk

 

 

Tendering

 

 

Three Rivers

 

 

Thurrock

 

 

Uttlesford

 

 

Waveney

 

Total for Region

23

0

 

R E G I O N

IMPLEMENTED

FIRMLY COMMITTED

LONDON[3]

Barking & Dagenham

Kingston

 

Barnet

 

 

Brent

 

 

Camden

 

 

City of London

 

 

Croydon

 

 

Ealing

 

 

Enfield

 

 

Greenwich

 

 

Haringey

 

 

Harrow

 

 

Hillingdon

 

 

Hounslow

 

 

Islington

 

 

Lambeth

 

 

Lewisham

 

 

Merton

 

 

Newham

 

 

Redbridge

 

 

Richmond

 

 

Southwark

 

 

Sutton

 

 

Tower Hamlets

 

 

Waltham Forest

 

 

Wandsworth

 

Total for Region

25

1

 

 

 

NORTH EAST[4]

Durham

South Tyneside

 

Hartlepool

Sunderland

 

Middlesbrough

 

 

Redcar & Cleveland

 

Total for Region

4

2

 

 

 

NORTHERN IRELAND

Belfast

 

 

Mid Ulster

 

Total for Region

2

0

 

 

 

NORTH WEST

Allerdale

Cheshire East

 

Bolton

Warrington

 

Blackpool

 

 

Burnley

 

 

Carlisle

 

 

Chorley

 

 

Copeland

 

 

Cumbria

 

 

Hyndburn

 

 

Knowsley

 

 

Lancashire

 

 

Lancaster

 

 

Liverpool

 

 

Manchester

 

 

Oldham

 

 

Preston

 

R E G I O N

IMPLEMENTED

FIRMLY COMMITTED

North West (continued)

Rochdale

 

 

Rossendale

 

 

Salford

 

 

Stockport

 

 

Tameside

 

 

West Lancashire

 

 

Wirral

 

Total for Region

23

2

 

 

 

SOUTH EAST[5]

 

Ashford

 

 

Brighton & Hove

 

 

 

Canterbury

 

 

Cherwell

 

 

Crawley

 

 

 

Dartford

 

 

 

Eastleigh

 

 

 

Epsom & Ewell

 

 

Gravesham

 

 

Hastings

 

 

Horsham

 

 

Milton Keynes

 

 

 

Oxford City[6]

 

 

 

Portsmouth

 

 

 

Rother

 

 

Slough

 

 

Southampton

 

 

 

South Oxfordshire

 

 

 

Surrey

 

 

 

Tandridge

 

 

 

Tunbridge Wells

 

 

 

Vale of White Horse

 

 

 

Waverley

 

 

West Oxfordshire

 

 

Winchester

 

Total for Region

25

0

 

 

 

SOUTH WEST[7]

Bristol City

Bath & North East Somerset

 

Cheltenham

 

 

Cornwall

 

 

East Devon

 

 

Exeter

 

 

Forest of Dean

 

 

Gloucestershire

 

 

Gloucester City

 

 

Mendip

 

 

North Dorset

 

 

Plymouth

 

 

Sedgemoor

 

 

South Gloucestershire

 

 

Stroud

 

 

Taunton Deane

 

 

Tewkesbury

 

Total for Region

16

1

 

 

 

R E G I O N

IMPLEMENTED

FIRMLY COMMITTED

WALES

Caerphilly

Anglesey

 

Cardiff

Rhondda Cynon Taff

 

Monmouthshire

 

 

Newport

 

 

Powys

 

 

Swansea

 

Total for Region

6

2

 

 

 

WEST MIDLANDS

Birmingham

 

 

Bromsgrove

 

 

Cannock Chase

 

 

Coventry

 

 

Malvern Hills

 

 

Newcastle-Under-Lyme

 

 

Nuneaton & Bedworth

 

 

Redditch

 

 

Rugby

 

 

Stoke on Trent

 

 

Stratford

 

 

Walsall

 

 

Warwick

 

 

Wolverhampton

 

 

Worcester

 

 

Wychavon

 

 

Wyre Forest

 

Total for Region

17

0

 

 

 

YORKSHIRE & HUMBER

Barnsley

Leeds

 

Bradford

 

 

Calderdale

 

 

Doncaster

 

 

Harrogate

 

 

Kirklees

 

 

North East Lincs

 

 

Rotherham

 

 

Scarborough

 

 

Sheffield

 

 

Wakefield

 

 

York

 

Total for Region

12

1

 

TOTAL

 

175

 

9

Those authorities in bold italics are accredited by the Living Wage Foundation

(As at September 2015)

Those in red are not covered by National Joint Council pay bargaining

2 Living Wage or National Living Wage - the difference explained -  By Damian Clarkson, Press Association Finance Editor dated 2nd November 2015.

The Living Wage is being increased by up to 40p an hour today, it was announced today.

However, this should not be confused with the National Living Wage, which will be phased in by the Government from next year and effectively replaces the current Minimum Wage.

This article explains the difference between the three different wage initiatives.

:: National Living Wage

This was announced by the Chancellor in the summer Budget. From April 2016, workers aged 25 and over must be paid at least £7.20 an hour.

This compulsory threshold will gradually increase to £9 an hour by 2020, and will apply to both part-time and full-time workers.

:: Living Wage

This was set up by the Living Wage Foundation, which it said is calculated according to the cost of living in the UK and updated annually.

It is not compulsory for employers to pay it, hence it is often referred to as the voluntary Living Wage to avoid confusion with the National Living Wage.

Today it was increased by 40p to £8.25 an hour outside of London and £9.40 an hour in the capital - notably more than the Government's impending targets.

:: National Minimum Wage

This is currently set at £6.70 an hour. It will continue to apply to all workers aged 21 to 24, who will not benefit from the increases to the National Living Wage next year.

For workers aged 18 to 20, the National Minimum Wage is set at £5.30 an hour, while for under-18s it is £3.87 and for apprentices £3.30.


[1] Hinckley & Bosworth has a pay structure that means that all employees are already paid more than the Living Wage although it has not been specifically adopted

[2] Great Yarmouth,

Hertsmere, South Cambs

and Watford have pay structures that mean that all employees are already paid more than the Living Wage although it has not been specifically adopted

[3] Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham and Westminster have pay structures that mean that all employees are already paid more than the Living Wage although it has not been specifically adopted

[4] Darlington’s structure means that all employees are paid at or above the Living Wage, but is has not been formally adopted

[5] Basingstoke & Deane, Bracknell Forest,

Elmbridge, Guildford

, Havant, 

Maidstone, Reading, Shepway, Spelthorne, Swale, Test Valley, Tonbridge & Malling, Wealden

and Wokingham  have pay structures that mean all employees are paid at or above the Living Wage, although it has not been specifically adopted

[6]Committed to paying 95% of the London Living Wage

[7] Isles of Scilly, South Somerset, West Dorset and Weymouth & Portland have pay structures that means all employees are already paid more than the Living Wage although it has not been specifically adopted

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