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Rail Fares Rocket 36% Since 2010

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

 

GMB SLAMS ‘COMMUTER TAX’ AS RAIL FARES SET TO RISE 36% SINCE 2010

Union says eye watering rise proves deck is stacked against working people

Rail fares will rise by 3.2% in January, following the ONS’s announcement of the July RPI rate.

The announcement means that the average price of regulated rail fares, such as season tickets, will have risen by 36% since 2010. [1]

The increase in travel prices is significantly above forecast average wage growth of 2.4% next year. [2]

Tim Roache, GMB General Secretary said:

"Millions of passengers face a grim start to the New Year when they are forced to pay even more extortionate prices for a frankly shocking service from the privatised rail companies.

"Rising travel costs, effectively a commuter tax, place an intolerable burden on working people, especially when wage rates don’t keep pace.

"The annual price hike seems to be the only part of the privatised railway that always runs as scheduled. Today’s announcement proves once again that the deck is stacked against ordinary working people."

ENDS

Contact: GMB Press Office on 07958 156846 or at press.office@gmb.org.uk

Notes for editors:

[1] Regulated rail fares, which include almost all season tickets, are raised in January by the 12-month RPI rate of the preceding July.

Before 2014, rail fares were raised by RPI+1%.

Year

 

 

Average increase (%)

 

 

Index of prices

 

 

2010

 

 

 

100

 

 

2011

 

 

5.8

 

 

105.8

 

 

2012

 

 

6

 

 

112.1

 

 

2013

 

 

4.2

 

 

116.9

 

 

2014

 

 

3.1

 

 

120.5

 

 

2015

 

 

2.5

 

 

123.5

 

 

2016

 

 

1

 

 

124.7

 

 

2017

 

 

1.9

 

 

127.1

 

 

2018

 

 

3.6

 

 

131.7

 

 

2019

 

 

3.2

 

 

135.9

 

 

Sources: House of Commons Library, Railways: fares statistics, 04 June 2018, Table A5 https://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/SN06384; GMB calculations.

[2] Forecast average earnings taken from OBR, Economic and Fiscal Outlook: March 2018, Table 3:10, printed page 83 http://cdn.obr.uk/EFO-MaRch_2018.pdf

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