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Real Value Of Pay Still 10.4% Down On 2007

Monday, December 8, 2014

Real Value Of Earnings For Full Time Workers In UK Still 10.4% Below 2007 Level

It is the lowest paid and the carers that are worst affected and that these are carrying the heaviest burden is borne out by recent comments from members says GMB.

The real value of earnings for full time workers in all occupational groups in UK is still 10.4% below its value in 2007.

The real value of earnings for full time workers in the lower occupational group of jobs in UK is still 12.6% below its value in 2007. This is the occupational group that has fared the worst since 2007.

Jobs in this main occupational group include security guards, shelf fillers, hospital porters, kitchen and catering assistant jobs, waiters and waitresses, bar staff,  farm workers, forestry workers, unskilled construction jobs , industrial cleaning process jobs, packers, bottlers, canners and fillers, postal workers, mail sorters, messengers and couriers, window cleaners, street cleaners, cleaners and domestics, launderers, dry cleaners and pressers, refuse and salvage jobs, parking jobs, school midday jobs, and leisure and theme park attendants.

The next worst affected occupational group are the caring, leisure and other service occupations where the real value of earnings for full time workers is still 11.3% below its value in 2007.

Jobs in this main occupational group include care workers and home carers,  senior care workers,  nursery nurses and assistants, childminders, playworkers, teaching assistants and educational support assistants, veterinary nurses, pest control officers , nursing auxiliaries and assistants, ambulance staff (excluding paramedics), dental nurses, houseparents and residential wardens,  care escorts, undertakers and  mortuary and crematorium assistants.

This data is in a new analysis by GMB of the recently published Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) for 2014 compared with comparable data from ASHE for 2007 for the year before the recession. Set out in the table below is the comparable data available for the 9 main occupational groups and the 21 occupational sub groups. Inflation has been 24.5% between April 2007 and April 2014. Set out in Notes to Editors are sources and definitions.

The real value of average earnings for full time workers in protective service jobs are down 15.3% on 2007. This is the occupational sub group that has fared worst since 2007.            

Jobs included in this group are NCOs and other ranks, police officers (sergeant and below), fire service officers (watch manager and below), prison service officers (below principal officer), police community support officers and other protective service associate professionals.

 

Mean Full-time

 

 

2007

2014

% change taking inflation into account

All employees

30,015

33,475

-10.4

 

   

 

Elementary occupations

17,287

18,807

-12.6

Caring, leisure and other service occupations

16,455

18,173

-11.3

Process, plant and machine operatives

21,799

24,416

-10.0

Skilled trades occupations

23,589

26,971

-8.2

Administrative and secretarial occupations

19,555

23,565

-3.2

Sales and customer service occupations

15,808

19,123

-2.8

 

     

  Protective service occupations

34,388

36,271

-15.3

  Culture, media and sports occupations

30,089

32,004

-14.6

  Business, media and public service professionals

40,457

43,079

-14.5

  Process, plant and machine operatives

21,823

23,474

-13.6

  Textiles, printing and other skilled trades

18,703

20,488

-12.0

  Science, engineering and technology associate professionals

27,699

30,415

-11.8

  Caring personal service occupations

15,783

17,493

-11.0

  Elementary administration and service occupations

16,637

18,534

-10.5

  Teaching and educational professionals

34,046

37,970

-10.4

  Elementary trades and related occupations

17,904

19,985

-10.3

  Leisure, travel and related personal service occupations

18,590

20,983

-9.3

  Skilled agricultural and related trades

17,744

20,029

-9.3

  Science, research, engineering and technology professionals

38,192

43,374

-8.8

  Skilled construction and building trades

23,426

26,671

-8.5

  Secretarial and related occupations

19,636

22,534

-7.8

  Sales occupations

15,195

17,596

-7.0

  Transport and mobile machine drivers and operatives

21,766

25,451

-6.1

  Skilled metal, electrical and electronic trades

25,652

29,999

-6.1

  Administrative occupations

19,537

23,779

-2.2

  Business and public service associate professionals

34,038

41,760

-1.4

  Customer service occupations

17,434

21,920

1.0

Paul Kenny, GMB General Secretary said "Pay has not kept up with inflation for those in work. The increase in economic activity is partly linked to population growth as GDP per head is still 3% below 2007 levels.

These figures show that the real value of take home pay for workers is still well below pre–recession levels.

It is the lowest paid and the carers that are worst affected and that these are carrying the heaviest burden is borne out by recent comments from GMB members.”

Four GMB members on low pay told the union:

"I have a wife and two young daughters aged 3 & 8. Currently I go to work at 7 am and don't get home until 7pm or even later. For the majority of the days in a week I do not get to see my children at all but I have to work these crazy hours to pay the bills and keep my kids fed and in clothes. My quality of life is zero because I simply have to work all the time and have little to no family life at all. My company does not pay overtime either, so it is really tough just to earn enough to scrape through the weeks and months."

" I never go on holiday, can't afford a car, don't eat much meat as I can't afford to, only buy christmas present for my daughter, never go out, don't buy new clothes.’

"Everyday bills all mount up and once they are all paid you have very little for food or to go and enjoy life."

"Every penny needs to be accounted for. We buy supermarkets own brands, collect save money coupons and buy one get one free."

End

Contact: Cath Speight GMB National Political Officer 07506 711925 or Kamaljeet Jandu, GMB National Equality and Diversity Officer on 07956 237178 or Brian Strutton, GMB National Secretary for Public Services on 07860 606137 or Gary Doolan, GMB National Political Officer on 07852 182358 or Martin Smith, GMB National Organiser on 07974 251722 or GMB Press Office 07921 28988.

Notes to editors

Sources and definitions

1) Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics

2) The figures are annual Mean salary for all Full-time employees

3) % change figures take into account an inflation rate of 24.5% from April 2007 to April 2014.

4) It is not possible to use the figures for the following occupations due to changes in the Standard Industrial Classifications from 2000 to 2010: 1 Digit Occupations: Managers, directors and senior officials; Professional occupations; Associate professional and technical occupations. 2 digit Occupations: Corporate managers and directors; Other managers and proprietors; Health professionals; Health and social care associate professionals

5) The most significant areas of change between the 2000 and 2010 Classification have been to introduce a stricter definition of managers and the reallocation of most nursing occupations from Major Group 3 (Associate professional and technical) to Major Group 2 (Professional Occupations). Therefore, the number of managers included in 2007 will be much higher than those in 2014. Many supervisory roles who had ‘manager’ as a job title will have been moved to other classifications.

6) The 2007 ASHE data uses Standard Occupational Classification 2000 and the 2014 data uses Standard Occupational Classification 2014.

The 1 digit 2000 Standard Occupational Classifications are:

1

Managers and senior officials

2

Professional occupations

3

Associate professional and technical occupations

4

Administrative and secretarial occupations

5

Skilled trades occupations

6

Personal service occupations

7

Sales and customer service occupations

8

Process, plant and machine operatives

9

Elementary occupations

 

The 2 digit 2000 Standard Occupational Classifications are:

 

Corporate managers

Managers and proprietors in agriculture and services

Science and technology professionals

Health professionals

Teaching and research professionals

Business and public service professionals

Science and technology associate professionals

Health and social welfare associate professionals

Protective service occupations

Culture, media and sports occupations

Business and public service associate professionals

Administrative occupations

Secretarial and related occupations

Skilled agricultural trades

Skilled metal and electrical trades

Skilled construction and building trades

Textiles, printing and other skilled trades

Caring personal service occupations

Leisure and other personal service occupations

Sales occupations

Customer service occupations

Process, plant and machine operatives

Transport and mobile machine drivers and operatives

Elementary trades, plant and storage related occupations

Elementary administration and service occupations

 

 

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